What to Expect If You're Getting a Crown

Dental crowns are a popular and versatile restorative treatment for people with badly damaged teeth. Each year in the U.S., millions of crowns are placed, helping people of all ages relieve painful symptoms, protect their oral health, and feel more confident and attractive.

At The Glen Dental, Aman Bhullar, DMD, and Donald Pepper, DDS, use the most advanced techniques and materials for dental crowns, customizing each treatment for the best possible results. If you’ve got a crown in your future, here’s what you can expect during and after your treatment.

How dental crowns work

Dental crowns are hard, durable “shells” that slip over a damaged tooth to protect it and make it look beautiful. Crowns can correct an array of oral health issues, including:

Crowns are also used to anchor a dental bridge, another type of restoration used to replace one or more missing teeth. Crowns play a starring role in dental implant procedures, where they act as a replacement for a tooth that’s been lost.

Your dental crown will be made of porcelain or ceramic that’s tinted to match your other teeth, so it blends in perfectly. One thing to remember: Crowns can’t be whitened. Some patients opt to have a teeth whitening treatment before having a crown put in place, so their teeth always look their absolute best.

The crown procedure: What to expect

Crowns typically take at least two office visits — the first to prepare the tooth and the second to have the crown permanently placed. Because a crown fits over your tooth like a glove, Dr. Bhullar or Dr. Pepper needs to make room for the crown by shaving down and shaping your tooth. Without this critical step, there would not be enough room surrounding the tooth for the crown to fit.

Once your tooth is expertly shaped, an impression or mold is made of your tooth. The mold is sent to a dental lab that specializes in making porcelain crowns. In the meantime, you’ll be fitted for a temporary crown to protect the tooth and keep you comfortable.

It takes a few weeks for a crown to be made. Once it’s ready, you’ll come back for your second visit. This is when your crown is carefully fitted to your tooth and adjusted so it “sits” comfortably in your mouth. With a bit of polishing, your new crown will look beautiful and feel and function just like the rest of your teeth.

After your crown is in place

Once your crown is on your tooth, you can care for it just like you care for the rest of your teeth. That means regular brushing and flossing and routine dental cleanings to keep the underlying tooth and gum healthy. 

Although your crown is very durable, it can still be cracked or chipped, just like your natural teeth. Avoid chewing on ice and other tough substances since these can damage your crown and your other teeth, too.

Crowns can be used alone or as part of a complete smile makeover, featuring a series of treatments designed to help your smile look its best. To learn how crowns can restore your beautiful smile, call the office or book an appointment online today.

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